Tag Archives: Kaplan

fun GMAT toys

I should have posted this a long time ago: the good people over at GMAT Club have created a GMAT score estimator. You can punch in your Manhattan GMAT, Kaplan, GMATPrep, and Princeton Review scores, and they’ll give an estimate of your score on the actual GMAT exam, based on a model that they’ve developed. You can find the GMAT score estimator here. I’m not sure how well it works, but it’s a brilliant idea.

I’ve had far less luck with the GMAT score calculator created by 800Score.com. The idea is that you can punch in your raw scores from the math and verbal sections of the GMAT (on a 0-60 scale), and the website will calculate your composite GMAT score on a 200-800 scale. I’ve tried the calculator a few times using my students’ raw scores from GMATPrep and actual GMAT tests, and the calculator always seems to be off by a little bit.

More recently, I punched in my own scores from the real GMAT. According to the calculator, a quant score of 51 and a verbal score of 47 will give you a composite score of 350, in the 7th percentile. Hilarious. Still a fun toy, but the execution could use some work.

comparing GMAT tutoring rates (no, not mine)

I was just thinking about the good ol’ days when I worked for a big test-prep company, and I was curious to see what the going rate might be for GMAT tutoring purchased through similar companies. In case you’re curious, here are GMAT private tutoring rates for the four biggest names in GMAT test-prep, presented in alphabetical order:

Kaplan: rates range from about $133/hr (with purchase of a 35-hour GMAT tutoring package) to $163/hr (if you buy only 15 hours).

Manhattan GMAT: $185/hr if you purchase 25 hours, $215/hr if you only buy 10 hours of private tutoring

Princeton Review: prices range from $150-$450/hr, depending on whether you choose a “standard” GMAT tutor, a “master” GMAT tutor, or a “premier” GMAT tutor.

Veritas: about $164/hr with purchase of a 42-hour GMAT tutoring package, $175 if you go for 28 hours, $200/hr for 14 hours.

These rates were taken from each company’s own website on July 15, 2009. If asked, I searched for GMAT tutors in New York City–it’s possible that rates are different outside of NYC.

I’ll let you draw your own conclusions on this. All I’m going to say is that I earned less than $20/hour in 2002 when I worked as a test-prep tutor and classroom instructor for one of these companies, and I was given very little training by the company. I’m not saying that it isn’t worth the price–after all, these companies usually include a fat wad of books and materials in the tutoring package, and it’s arguably worth the extra money to hire a familiar, “reliable” company. I’m not going to tell you that independent GMAT tutors are necessarily better for everybody, but if you go with one of the big GMAT test-prep behemoths, please shop carefully.