Tag Archives: GMAT tutoring

How lucky was Mr. Fat Pants?

If any of you are expecting a practical, useful article about GMAT tutoring, I apologize in advance:  this is going to be a pretty useless, vaguely technocratic article about standardized testing.  Consider yourself warned.

A couple of years ago, I wrote a blog post about a fellow named Mr. FP (Mr. “Fat Pants”), who once wrote a brilliant MBA application essay about his lunchtime festivities at the office.  Mr. FP deserves to be a legend simply because he actually used the phrase “fat pants” in his MBA admissions essays, but he’s also notorious (in my little GMAT world, anyway) for springing a huge test-day surprise on both himself and his GMAT tutor:  he scored a 680 and then a 640 on his only two full-length GMATPrep practice tests, then nailed a 720 on the actual GMAT—just a few days after the 640.  Mr. FP is a great guy who kicked all sorts of ass at a top-10 business school… but we agree that he got a little bit lucky.

But how lucky did he get?  And can we somehow quantify his luck?

The quick answer is that Mr. FP was pretty darned lucky.  If you dive deep into the bowels of your GMAT score report (sorry for the image; do you really want to dive “deep into the bowels” of anything?), you’ll see some mumbo-jumbo about something called the standard error of measurement, and the score report will tell you that the standard error of measurement is about 30 points on the GMAT.

To understand the idea of a standard error of measurement, imagine for a moment that you have something called a “true” GMAT score.  There are two ways to think about a “true” GMAT score.  First, you could imagine that it’s the score you would receive if the GMAT always did a 100% perfect, 100% consistent job of measuring your verbal and quantitative reasoning skills (or whatever it is that the GMAT actually measures).  If that doesn’t seem intuitive, imagine this:  you’ll take the GMAT, I’ll wipe out your memory of the exam using the “flashy thingy” from the Men in Black movies (so that you don’t remember any of the questions), then I’ll send you back to the very same GMAT test appointment using a time machine from the Back to the Future movies.  I’ll do this an infinite number of times.  Assuming that you don’t get brain damage, your average score on your infinite number of GMAT exams would be your “true score.”

Of course, you wouldn’t always get exactly the same score on every single test appointment, even if we conjure some Hollywood magic to eliminate all day-to-day variations in your test-taking behavior.  The truth is that GMAT scores are a little bit random.  Or maybe a lot random.  Even if you behaved exactly the same way every single time you took the test, you’d still get slightly different GMAT scores from one day to the next.  That’s an inevitable part of standardized testing, especially on an adaptive exam that spits out somewhat randomized questions.

Back to the technical crap:  the standard error of measurement is basically a measure of that random variation in your scores from one GMAT exam to the next, even if we assume that you’re a robotic test-taker who always behaves the same way.  If you’ve taken a few statistics courses, you could think of the standard error of measurement as the rough equivalent of a standard deviation for your GMAT score:  since the GMAT’s standard error of measurement is around 30 points, roughly 2/3 of all test-takers will score within 30 points of their “true” GMAT score, and roughly 95% of test-takers will score within 60 points of their “true” GMAT score.

In other words, your GMAT score could plausibly fluctuate by around 30 points from day to day, but you aren’t terribly likely to gain or lose 60 points simply by random chance.

With this in mind, Mr. FP seemed to be a very lucky man.  We’ll never know Mr. FP’s “true” GMAT score, but based on his homework and GMATPrep test results, I would have wagered that he was in line for a 660 or so—halfway between his two GMATPrep scores.  If we pretend that 660 really was his “true” GMAT score, then Mr. FP scored 60 points—or two standard errors of measurement—above his “true” score.

If you’re a statistics geek, you’re welcome to bust out your favorite z-chart and do the calculations yourself, but the bottom line is that there was roughly a 1 in 40 (2.5%) chance that Mr. FP would receive a random gift of 60 or more points from the GMAT gods.  And keep in mind that any random, luck-based deviation from your “true” GMAT score could work in your favor—but it’s equally likely that it will work against you:  if 1 out of every 40 test-takers will earn at least 60 “measurement error points” that they don’t “deserve”, then 1 out of every 40 test-takers will lose at least 60 points on their GMAT score, just from bad stinking luck.  The gods of random chance are sometimes very kind, but they’re also randomly very cruel.

So if you’re still 60 or so points away from your ideal GMAT score and you want to roll the dice, go for it.  But your odds of a Mr. FP-esque stroke of good luck aren’t all that good, and it’s probably better to hit the GMAT books hard and make your own luck.

maybe a nice, relaxed approach to the GMAT is a good idea?

Yeah, I know:  your GMAT test score is really important to your personal and professional goals, and your test date is written on your calendar in huge red letters.  Right now, you’re planning your entire life with that date in mind.  You’re taking it extremely seriously.  That makes perfect sense.

But let me tell you a story anyway.  Once upon a time, there was a New Yorker named Mr. FP.  (In case you’re curious, “FP” stands for “fat pants,” because he used that term in one of the most entertaining MBA application essays I’ve ever read.)  At the time, Mr. FP worked in a demanding finance job, and he struggled to find time for his GMAT studies.  He scheduled his first GMAT test date for late December, but wasn’t able to do quite as much studying as he had hoped.

Still, Mr. FP took his two GMATPrep tests in the week leading up to his test date, despite the fact that he didn’t feel 100% ready for the exam.  On his first GMATPrep test, he scored a 680.  Not bad, right?  The 680 was a pleasant surprise, considering Mr. FP’s difficulties with some of the homework.  A few days before his exam, Mr. FP took the second GMATPrep test, and only scored a 640.  Not spectacular, especially since his goal was a 700.

At that point, it was clear that Mr. FP didn’t have a very good shot at getting a 700.  He’s a brilliant guy, but we agreed that he had specific GMAT weaknesses, and his practice tests weren’t going terribly well.  But Mr. FP is a pretty laid-back fellow, and he took the situation in stride.

“Whatever dude,” he said, in our final GMAT tutoring session before his exam, “It’s my first time taking the test, and it’s too late to get my money back.  So I’ll just take it as a practice test, and maybe I’ll learn something or whatever.”

Two days later, Mr. FP called me immediately after he left his GMAT exam, and he was laughing so hard that he couldn’t even tell me what happened.  Eventually, he spit out the news:  he got a 720.  And he thought it was absolutely hilarious.

The moral of the story?  I’m not certain that there is one.  Maybe Mr. FP is just a really, really lucky man.  Or maybe he performed incredibly well because he was relaxed, and didn’t take the GMAT overly seriously that day.  Whenever he got rough questions, he didn’t let them rattle him—he just shrugged, made his best guess, and calmly moved on.  Whatever Mr. FP did that day, it worked.

You know that I’m in awe of the work ethic of most of my GMAT students.  But maybe some of you try a little bit too hard sometimes.  Just some food for thought.

comparing GMAT tutoring rates (no, not mine)

I was just thinking about the good ol’ days when I worked for a big test-prep company, and I was curious to see what the going rate might be for GMAT tutoring purchased through similar companies. In case you’re curious, here are GMAT private tutoring rates for the four biggest names in GMAT test-prep, presented in alphabetical order:

Kaplan: rates range from about $133/hr (with purchase of a 35-hour GMAT tutoring package) to $163/hr (if you buy only 15 hours).

Manhattan GMAT: $185/hr if you purchase 25 hours, $215/hr if you only buy 10 hours of private tutoring

Princeton Review: prices range from $150-$450/hr, depending on whether you choose a “standard” GMAT tutor, a “master” GMAT tutor, or a “premier” GMAT tutor.

Veritas: about $164/hr with purchase of a 42-hour GMAT tutoring package, $175 if you go for 28 hours, $200/hr for 14 hours.

These rates were taken from each company’s own website on July 15, 2009. If asked, I searched for GMAT tutors in New York City–it’s possible that rates are different outside of NYC.

I’ll let you draw your own conclusions on this. All I’m going to say is that I earned less than $20/hour in 2002 when I worked as a test-prep tutor and classroom instructor for one of these companies, and I was given very little training by the company. I’m not saying that it isn’t worth the price–after all, these companies usually include a fat wad of books and materials in the tutoring package, and it’s arguably worth the extra money to hire a familiar, “reliable” company. I’m not going to tell you that independent GMAT tutors are necessarily better for everybody, but if you go with one of the big GMAT test-prep behemoths, please shop carefully.

a quick acknowledgment

Most of you really don’t care, but I wanted to thank my friend (and GMAT student) Mike DeMeo for inspiring this website title.

I’ve been teaching and blogging for a long time, but never bothered to put all of my thoughts on GMAT tutoring in one place.  Mike, like many other people, gently harangued me for failing to have a concentrated web presence, and then jumped all over me (in a good way) when I accidentally used the phrase “GMAT ninja” during a lesson.  He was convinced that it should be the name for my GMAT business, GMAT blog, and GMAT website.

And I (eventually) agreed.

Thanks, Mike.  May the GMAT gods grant you a big, fat, juicy 750 on your next GMAT score report.