Tag Archives: GMAT club

don’t let the GMAT forums fool you

If you poke through popular GMAT forums like Beat the GMAT or GMAT Club, you’ll quickly encounter dozens of tales of GMAT glory.  You’ll read about people who improved from 580 to 710 or from 440 to 630.  You might even encounter the amazing story of the guy who got a 420 on his first practice test, and eventually made it to Harvard.  These “I just beat the GMAT!” stories seem to be everywhere, and some of them make beating the GMAT sound awfully easy.

Almost every week, somebody contacts me about GMAT tutoring, and asks me why they haven’t been able to crush the GMAT like everybody in the GMAT forums.  And the first part of my answer is always the same:  there really aren’t that many forum participants crushing the GMAT.  It just looks like it.

The triumphant tales of GMAT success receive tons of comments, and end up getting bumped to the top of the forums.  But for every loud “I just clobbered the GMAT!” story with 40 comments, there are at least five (mostly unnoticed) GMAT forum posts that begin or end with “please help!!!” And I’m sure that there are exponentially more GMAT forum “lurkers” who have been demoralized by the GMAT, but choose not to post anything online.  The people who get ripped to shreds by the GMAT either post a very quiet “um, how do I improve?” query on the boards, or they don’t say anything at all.

So whatever else you do over the course of your GMAT preparations, don’t delude yourself into thinking that you suck because “everybody else is beating the GMAT.”  They aren’t.  Only a very small percentage of people who retake the GMAT actually improve their scores substantially.  Most GMAT test-takers are suffering, just like you.  And most of the guys who made huge GMAT score improvements also suffered, just like you.

So while the GMAT success stories are absolutely wonderful if you’re looking for some inspiration, keep them in perspective: we read these stories because they’re relatively rare.  That’s why they get all of the attention on the GMAT forums.

If you’re having a hard time with the GMAT, you’re definitely not alone.  Spend some time in the darker corners of the GMAT forums, and you’ll find plenty of people just like yourself, who are working their butts off to achieve their goals.  The GMAT may be easy for a very small handful of people, but if you want to improve by 100 points or more, you’ll have to work like crazy.  But at least you’ll have plenty of company.

GMAT reading comprehension, sentence correction, and a monkey…?

The fine folks who produce the GMAT exam aren’t usually known for their sense of humor, but they decided to release a series of “test tips” on their official GMAT facebook page.  And one of their GMAT test tips ended up being pretty funny… though perhaps not intentionally.

An astute member of the GMAT Club forum managed to post a screenshot of the flawed “test tip” before it was removed  from the official GMAT facebook page.  Thanks to his quick internet trigger finger, we’re blessed with the following (slightly goofy) GMAT test-taking advice:

GMAT Test Tips: Reading Comprehension

Agreement is Key.

Subject-verb, verb tense, and pronoun to noun/pronoun agreement are essential to a proper sentence.

Yes, you definitely need to pay very close attention to “pronoun to noun/pronoun agreement” on… GMAT reading comprehension??

But that’s not the funny part.  Check out the original GMAT Club post for a portrait of the banana-munching scholar who might have written this text.

 

fun GMAT toys

I should have posted this a long time ago: the good people over at GMAT Club have created a GMAT score estimator. You can punch in your Manhattan GMAT, Kaplan, GMATPrep, and Princeton Review scores, and they’ll give an estimate of your score on the actual GMAT exam, based on a model that they’ve developed. You can find the GMAT score estimator here. I’m not sure how well it works, but it’s a brilliant idea.

I’ve had far less luck with the GMAT score calculator created by 800Score.com. The idea is that you can punch in your raw scores from the math and verbal sections of the GMAT (on a 0-60 scale), and the website will calculate your composite GMAT score on a 200-800 scale. I’ve tried the calculator a few times using my students’ raw scores from GMATPrep and actual GMAT tests, and the calculator always seems to be off by a little bit.

More recently, I punched in my own scores from the real GMAT. According to the calculator, a quant score of 51 and a verbal score of 47 will give you a composite score of 350, in the 7th percentile. Hilarious. Still a fun toy, but the execution could use some work.